Internal Brand

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Culture Links the Internal and External Brand

Category: Internal Brand

The internal brand identifies what is important to an organization and why it exists. At RedKnight we talk about the internal brand as being made up of the vision, mission, values and company belief systems.

The external brand ultimately is how your customer perceives your company. It is influenced heavily by the company’s marketing message and the avenues it uses to spread the message. However, because experience impacts our perceptions more strongly and memorably than just words, the customer experience has an even stronger influence on the external brand.

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We Enrich People’s Lives Through Cheese

Category: Internal Brand

One of my favorite things to do when I go into the city is to visit Di Bruno Bros. I can’t count the number of times that I walked past their door without going in. Something would draw me to their door, I would peek through the window and I would see what I thought was a tiny center city Philadelphia grocery store. And then I would keep walking. After all, I took the train in and didn’t have a cooler. How was I going to take fresh foods home with me?

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Legally Speaking Radio Interview

Category: Internal Brand

Do you also like to listen to business information? Karen Jett, RedKnight’s Internal Brand Specialist, was interviewed by Kirsten Balzer-Miniscalco of Rubin, Glickman, Steinberg & Gifford on  the Legally Speaking show.

 

During the radio show, Kirsten and Karen chat about the importance of a company developing and using a brand definition. The brand is made up of 4 elements: the vision, mission, values, and company belief systems (referred to as operating guidelines during the interview).

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Tacit Assumptions Transcend Values

Category: Internal Brand

According to Edgar H. Schein in his book Humble Inquiry culture has two levels: espoused values and tacit assumptions. Before we talk about them, let’s define what he means. The espoused values are the values that we list in our corporate values. These are things like trust and team building.

 

Tacit assumptions, however, are deeper; so deep, in fact, that we rarely talk about them or even think about them. At one time, tacit assumptions may have been values. Then, over time, they became so taken for granted, that we stopped talking about them. This doesn’t mean that they went away, merely that they became semi-invisible. By this I mean that we live by them and believe in them at a deep level. However, we are not consciously aware that we are doing so.

 

Unfortunately, because they are at an unconscious level, our tacit assumptions frequently cause problems for us. These issues frequently manifest as difficulties following our espoused core values.

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Do What it Takes Costs Company $1.2 Billion

Category: Internal Brand

When I assist companies to identify their company values, one of the most popular choices is “Do what it takes.” Unfortunately, this value is dysfunctional as it encourages people to do whatever it takes to succeed – and for many, this means crossing the line into approaches that are iffy at best and illegal at worst.

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Starbucks: A Slow Extinction of Culture

Category: Internal Brand

“The Starbucks culture is singular. I haven’t experienced it anywhere else. What’s happening is a slow extinction of that culture.”

Jaime Prater

 

Once again, Starbucks is at a crossroads. In the early to mid 2000’s Starbucks concentrated all of its energy on expansion. During this period, the company culture and internal branding was virtually ignored. The result: Sales were down, market share was decreasing, and Howard Schultz decided it was time to return as CEO.

 

Mr. Schultz’s turnaround strategy was simple: return to basics.

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Compassionate Bulldog

Category: Internal Brand

When we work with companies to assist them to identify their core business values, we explain that simply identifying and documenting their values is not enough. Unfortunately, a single word, short phrase, or even a single sentence is not usually adequate to fully explain what is meant by a core value. That is because many words can be a bit ambiguous and may be interpreted by different individuals to mean different things resulting in inconsistencies in internal behavior.

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